Sunday, 14 May 2017

KILIO CHA WATOTO KARATU : TUENDELEE KUHUZUNIKA HADI LINI?


Ingawa muda umepita  tulioko Ughaibuni  tunawapa pole waliofiwa Karatu. Tumeangalia picha zilizosambazwa kwa uchungu, maastajabu na majonzi. Kama mzazi picha moja iliniuma sana. Watoto wa Lucky Vincent wamesimama  wakijitayarisha kuondoka safari yao ya mwisho.  Wamevalia mavazi ya shule: furaha ya mtoto. Masomo, maisha, matumaini. 
Ila picha inayostahili  kujadiliwa zaidi ni ya wanaume kadhaa wakikwea basi , wakijaribu kunyofoa maiti zilizojibana bana.  Hapa ndipo kilipo kilinge na janga letu Waafrika leo.

EAST AFRICAN INPUT AT THE RICH MIX CLUB PIVOTS UP LONDON



 Somali poet, Ahmed Magare reads fervently at Rich Mix. Pic by F Macha

I was part of a beautiful day on Easter Sunday.
Rich Mix is definitely among hottest clubs in London at the moment. Strategically situated. Not just in Hackney but Shoreditch.

Saturday, 4 February 2017

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH JJ ADAMSON OF AFRICANS IN LONDON TV


I first met Joseph Otieno Adamson when he was managing a music studio in Hackney, East London, 1999.  I was then hosting a World Music Nights at two venues in the city. Some of the artists had been recorded and produced or were known to Joseph since the days he was a popular musician in Nairobi in the 1980s.

VIDEO OF FLOGGING WOMAN CAUSES DISCUSSION ON FACEBOOK





Usually most images posted on social media do not have captions. Most senders have received them elsewhere and merely want to “pass on” with no comments. Only a few people write meaningful captions. Majority of us think the internet is a place of self exhibition and self reassurance.  I am here. Watch me. Me, me, me.... But the duty of social information, as every true journalist knows is inform, educate, break news to our communities and eventually assist in meaningful change. 


That is why I liked recent captions by a  prominent Tanzanian businessman recently. Both are in the two main official languages of Tanzania. In the first one, displayed last week, Mwafrika Merinyo, wrote :
“Cruelty against women goes unabated in Tanzania
Ukatili dhidi ya wanawake unaendelea bila vikwazo Tanzania!”

Friday, 13 January 2017

STANDING ON THE BEACH WITH A FAG AND A GUITAR


I must admit when I was a young twenty something old, I used to hold a piece of cigarette in my hand, just to look cool. I never liked the damn thing, but I just found it appealing and what is the word? Chic. Chic is “smart” in French. It is also “elegant”, “stylish”... “Dapper”, “debonair”.
Oui. The French might say, “Alors, c’est tres chic!”
The Swahili equivalent is Utanashati. Sharobaro.  In my youth days it was, Bitozi. Alluding to the best band of all time, The Beatles.  Made in Britain. Chic. Mmmh.  
Chic was a name of a 1970s African American band, which we loved to pieces. I still do, I should confess. Recently, the Chic co-founder, Nile Rodgers, (pictured)released an autobiography. Really funny, sad and very tough reading.


Friday, 2 December 2016

FIDEL CASTRO: AFRICAN HERO ATTRACTS DIFFERING OPINIONS

Fidel Castro and Mwalimu Nyerere at Dar es Salaam International Airport in 1977. Pic from Tanzanian Media

We live in a world of pairs. Two eyes. Duology.  Dark and light.
 Fidel Castro’s  death at 90, proved this point. Even his funeral on Sunday,  has these two divergent views.
 I was not living in the West when Fidel Castro was a big hero in Africa, over 40 years ago. I was not aware of how hated he was here. This week? So much “rubbishing” of his legacy continues pouring throughout the media. Even the American leaders have proved the twin view. President Obama acknowledged his influence while the new President Donald Trump called him a dictator.  Our earth has this endless, differing double outlook.


AMBASSADOR MIGIRO : CALM, ARTICULATE AND TO THE POINT

High Commissioner Migiro chats with some of the attendees

There are several angles to last Saturday’s event in London.
Number one is a  small circulating announcement promising the very first occasion to hear Dr. Asha Rose Migiro’s talk after being here for a few months. Dr Migiro would brief us on “current developments in Tanzania,” this as British Tanzania Society  chair Dr Andrew Coulson warned his audience, was a gigantic task. It is one year into the new Presidency, and “whatever you say will be of interest...you cannot go wrong,” the Birmingham University lecturer (who once taught at the University of Dar es Salaam and worked in the Ministry of Agriculture) said amidst laughter.

The other dynamic was the content of the attendees.